Common Core à la Lizbeth Benacquisto and Ghost Madalyn Murray O’Hair: A Political Analysis – Part 2 | James Pat Guerréro


lizbeth benacquisto
Lizbeth Benaquisto

Many Republicans get in line and file through the door, like the good Republican Lizbeth Benacquisto.  Thinking for herself is not required on her voting resume.  For instance, Common Core is one of those lapses in Benacquisto’s thought.  Political standardization might help a deficient memory just in time for the event a bad decision is made, like Common Core standardizes goals to help students prepare for college, and career, and life.

Atheist Madalyn Murray O’Hair never had a lapse in thought or made a bad decision.  Could she have flinched in the drive to rid public schools of bible readings?  She not even welcomed Dr. James Dobson to teach on the air waves.  O’Hair accomplished more atheistical in the public school system than anyone in American history.  Her ghost lives proudly and could impossibly make bad decisions.

Common Core was rejected by all the Republican candidates at the first debate (really a forum), including Lizbeth Benacquisto.[1]  But Benacquisto had co-introduced and voted for Common Core (SB1076); then, she somehow changed her mind, without retracting her vote.[2]  Having already chosen the Republican sense, she had followed the crowd led by Jeb Bush and most Republicans who have been for Common Core all along.[3]  But her memory had had a lapse of the fact she was also running for Florida’s 19th Congressional District Special Election.

The Common Core State Standards Initiative was begun in 2009 by the National Governors Association, composed of governors, and the Council of Chief State School Officers, composed of commissioners of education.[4]  These days when the leadership wants to improve education for kindergarten through 20th grade, a new standard has to be developed because the status quo is simply not good enough.

Madalyn Murray O’Hair went so far as to remove public prayer because bullying lowered her son’s status.  Amongst many accomplishments she achieved the universal reversal of education: taking away education for all to engender kindness for one person.  Education for O’Hair was a merry-go-round, in the sense of going nowhere, for everyone to get off for one person to ride – and everyone still had to pay his ticket for his favorite horse.

Lizbeth Benacquisto, like Jeb Bush, pushes Common Core, too.  Education “as is” is proof that standardization will improve education.  Another way of stating this is:  Money unspent “as is” is proof that standardization will improve education.  Republicans always have to find a way to ethically spend hard-earned taxpayers’ money – to ethically fill some other corporate pocket.

In other words, it was developed by two associations. Which group of citizens in the entire country asked them to develop the standards? Who is really behind the development for monetary purposes?  Money is!

The state observing a lack of standardization begs the question that standardization is the better good.  But, what is the proof of this?  Where is the evidence? How did the state arrive at this?  Benacquisto does not think this out:  her vote springs far sinister from down under the safer leap to the idea that a LACK of standardization might be the better good.

Madalyn Murray O’Hair took prayer out of schools. Benacquisto now takes civil freedom and religious liberty out of schools.

To pray and to read the bible in school should be civil freedoms; yet, the O’Hair ghost lives today.  To learn and to teach in school are also civil freedoms; but already Benacquisto dramatizes a ghostlike presence. But this ghost-likeness could possibly make bad decisions.

 

[1] http://www.news-press.com/livestream/article/20140225/NEWS01/302250038/Replay-Republican-congressional-debate-19th-District-seat

[2] http://www.flsenate.gov/Session/Bill/2013/1076/BillText/er/PDF (page 3, line 77-78)

[3] http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2014/mar/19/jeb-bush-follow-through-common-core-standards/?partner=newsletter_headlines

[4] http://www.corestandards.org

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